Utah: Riding in Zion National Park

I have produced one more video, this time much longer (7 minutes), while riding into Zion National Park via its eastern entrance road. (The video is viewable at the bottom of this post after the jump.)

This was yet another awesome geological experience to view on two wheels. What I enjoyed most about this park was…

…not the park itself, once you arrived at the Visitor’s Center, but the 12-mile ride along the entrance road through sweeping curves, gentle (not dramatic) changes in elevation, and being at the bottom of the valleys between towering structures on both sides.

We had stayed the night before in a small town near the Arizona border. I had wild dreams during ride planning that “S” and I would bop just 60 miles south to see the North Rim of the Grand Canyon early in the morning, but those darn monsoons had a mind of their own. It was raining down there, so that visit was a no-go. After the death-defying experiencing riding in a monsoon just a couple days before, there would not be any more monsoon riding for me!

The hotel at which we were staying offered prepackaged munchies for breakfast, but I wanted something more substantial. “S” found a recommendation for a bakery down the street, so we went there. Oh sheesh… what a disaster. “S” ordered an egg sandwich, but they load on all this goofy yuppie fad-food shit that it took them 25 minutes to make it. What’s worse, when the only egg dish they had was that goofy egg sandwich, I was looking for alternatives. Gliddy-glop-goop yuppie fad “artisan” dishes filled the menu board.

But what was this? A little chalkboard daily special? A Belgian waffle? Yay! I’ll get that. With a glass of fresh-squeezed orange juice, a waffle will hit the spot.

I was puzzled when I was asked, “do you want it warmed?” Well, of course waffles are served warm.

Imagine my surprise when I was served this 3-inch x 4-inch cookie ====>

While I was expecting this ====>

By the dour look on my face, the restaurant server could tell that I was displeased. She quickly stated, “our owner is from Belgium. She prepares real Belgian waffles. I guess you were expecting an American waffle?”

Duh… yeah. I have to give the restaurant server credit, though. She could tell that I was surprised and unhappy, so she quickly said, “Would a ham and cheese croissant put a smile on your face?”

Yes, it would. I smiled and thanked her. She toodled off into the restaurant. But it didn’t stop there. The restaurant owner felt compelled to come out and explain more about her choice to prepare a “real Belgian waffle” due to her heritage.

I just explained that I had a shock of differences of expectations, and that if they had displayed what they were offering as a “Belgian waffle” with more than a scribble on a chalkboard, I would not have been so surprised. But I didn’t want to get into an argument. They were being nice enough to offer me something else that was more substantial and filling “on the house.” They charge $10 for the ham-and-cheese croissant, which is why I didn’t order it in the first place because to me, that is too high a price just for a small sandwich. (Alas, I’ll never conform to the whims of yuppiedom and what they will accept for pricing and preparation of foods at “upscale” establishments. I am a biker, not a foodie.)

Anyway, after that lovely fulfilling and time-consuming stop for what we thought would be a quick breakfast, we mounted our respective iron horses and set off for Zion National Park, which I posted about here with photos.

Now for the much-anticipated longer video. Join me as I follow “S” on a ride entering the park. (BTW, free license music is just that. If you don’t like it, then turn down the volume.)

Life is short: enjoy the ride!

2 thoughts on “Utah: Riding in Zion National Park

    • Absolutely not! I’d never ride with someone so ill-shod for safe operation of a heavyweight motorcycle. S wore Belleville AF boots, just like I did. Great boots for hot-weather riding and also kept the feet dry when riding in a monsoon.

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